CEA decrees all 4K TVs to be called Ultra High Definition

posted on Wednesday, 24th October 2012 by Steve May

CES  4K 

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With OLED increasingly looking like yesterday's news, the Consumer Electronics Association, organisers of the International CES, have weighed in and declared that tomorrow's 4K TVs are to be known as Ultra High Definition. It says the name change will help US retailers sell the benefits of the super resolution screens, expected to arrive in force at January's CES.

It says all screens which offer a minimum of 3,840 X 2,160 resolution should be designated Ultra High-Definition. What's more, all Ultra HD display products must offer at least one digital input capable of carrying and presenting native 4K format video, without relying on up-converting.

Chairman of the CEA's Working Group on the issue, Gary Yacoubian, says: "We discussed and debated two important steps, the name and recommended attributes, in a forum that allowed a variety of key stakeholders, manufacturers, retailers, broadcasters and Hollywood professionals to lend their voices. As we educate and raise awareness among consumers, I look forward to working with our robust committee to pave the way for a successful rollout of Ultra HD."

It was obvious at IFA this year that there was no clear consensus how manufacturers should label 4K. LG called its 4K screen UDHD, Samsung opted for Ultra High Definition, Toshiba managed four labels - 4K, Quad Full HD, Quad FHD and 4xFHD - and Sharp called its model ICC LED (confusingly named after the Japanese company it was jointly developed with).

However according to a CEA survey, the 'Ultra High Definition' name rates highest when it comes to best communicating the benefits of the technology to porr confused, consumers.

Of course, just because the CEA has stamped its feet about Ultra HD doesn't mean the rest of the world has to follow. Sony retorted that it would continue to use the 4K label, saying its new 84-inch screen, the KD-84X9005, would be sold as 4K Ultra High definition. So there.

Steve May

Steve is a veteran of the UK consumer electronics industry, having covered it for
various media outlets for more than 20 years.

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